Articles | Volume 20, issue 4
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1123–1147, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-1123-2020
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1123–1147, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-1123-2020
Research article
27 Apr 2020
Research article | 27 Apr 2020

Evaluation of Global Fire Weather Database reanalysis and short-term forecast products

Robert D. Field

Related authors

A new snow module improves predictions of the isotope-enabled MAIDENiso forest growth model
Ignacio Hermoso de Mendoza, Etienne Boucher, Fabio Gennaretti, Aliénor Lavergne, Robert Field, and Laia Andreu-Hayles
Geosci. Model Dev., 15, 1931–1952, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-15-1931-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-15-1931-2022, 2022
Short summary
Changes in satellite retrievals of atmospheric composition over eastern China during the 2020 COVID-19 lockdowns
Robert D. Field, Jonathan E. Hickman, Igor V. Geogdzhayev, Kostas Tsigaridis, and Susanne E. Bauer
Atmos. Chem. Phys., 21, 18333–18350, https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-18333-2021,https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-21-18333-2021, 2021
Short summary
The impacts of recent drought on fire, forest loss, and regional smoke emissions in lowland Bolivia
Joshua P. Heyer, Mitchell J. Power, Robert D. Field, and Margreet J. E. van Marle
Biogeosciences, 15, 4317–4331, https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4317-2018,https://doi.org/10.5194/bg-15-4317-2018, 2018
Short summary
Historic global biomass burning emissions for CMIP6 (BB4CMIP) based on merging satellite observations with proxies and fire models (1750–2015)
Margreet J. E. van Marle, Silvia Kloster, Brian I. Magi, Jennifer R. Marlon, Anne-Laure Daniau, Robert D. Field, Almut Arneth, Matthew Forrest, Stijn Hantson, Natalie M. Kehrwald, Wolfgang Knorr, Gitta Lasslop, Fang Li, Stéphane Mangeon, Chao Yue, Johannes W. Kaiser, and Guido R. van der Werf
Geosci. Model Dev., 10, 3329–3357, https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-10-3329-2017,https://doi.org/10.5194/gmd-10-3329-2017, 2017
Short summary
Development of a Global Fire Weather Database
R. D. Field, A. C. Spessa, N. A. Aziz, A. Camia, A. Cantin, R. Carr, W. J. de Groot, A. J. Dowdy, M. D. Flannigan, K. Manomaiphiboon, F. Pappenberger, V. Tanpipat, and X. Wang
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 15, 1407–1423, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-15-1407-2015,https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-15-1407-2015, 2015
Short summary

Related subject area

Other Hazards (e.g., Glacial and Snow Hazards, Karst, Wildfires Hazards, and Medical Geo-Hazards)
Travel and terrain advice statements in public avalanche bulletins: a quantitative analysis of who uses this information, what makes it useful, and how it can be improved for users
Kathryn C. Fisher, Pascal Haegeli, and Patrick Mair
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 1973–2000, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1973-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1973-2022, 2022
Short summary
Data-driven automated predictions of the avalanche danger level for dry-snow conditions in Switzerland
Cristina Pérez-Guillén, Frank Techel, Martin Hendrick, Michele Volpi, Alec van Herwijnen, Tasko Olevski, Guillaume Obozinski, Fernando Pérez-Cruz, and Jürg Schweizer
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2031–2056, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-2031-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-2031-2022, 2022
Short summary
On the correlation between a sub-level qualifier refining the danger level with observations and models relating to the contributing factors of avalanche danger
Frank Techel, Stephanie Mayer, Cristina Pérez-Guillén, Günter Schmudlach, and Kurt Winkler
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 1911–1930, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1911-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1911-2022, 2022
Short summary
Automated avalanche hazard indication mapping on a statewide scale
Yves Bühler, Peter Bebi, Marc Christen, Stefan Margreth, Lukas Stoffel, Andreas Stoffel, Christoph Marty, Gregor Schmucki, Andrin Caviezel, Roderick Kühne, Stephan Wohlwend, and Perry Bartelt
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 1825–1843, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1825-2022,https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1825-2022, 2022
Short summary
Progress and challenges in glacial lake outburst flood research (2017–2021): a research community perspective
Adam Emmer, Simon K. Allen, Mark Carey, Holger Frey, Christian Huggel, Oliver Korup, Martin Mergili, Ashim Sattar, Georg Veh, Thomas Y. Chen, Simon J. Cook, Mariana Correas-Gonzalez, Soumik Das, Alejandro Diaz Moreno, Fabian Drenkhan, Melanie Fischer, Walter W. Immerzeel, Eñaut Izagirre, Ramesh Chandra Joshi, Ioannis Kougkoulos, Riamsara Kuyakanon Knapp, Dongfeng Li, Ulfat Majeed, Stephanie Matti, Holly Moulton, Faezeh Nick, Valentine Piroton, Irfan Rashid, Masoom Reza, Anderson Ribeiro de Figueiredo, Christian Riveros, Finu Shrestha, Milan Shrestha, Jakob Steiner, Noah Walker-Crawford, Joanne L. Wood, and Jacob C. Yde
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-143,https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-143, 2022
Revised manuscript accepted for NHESS
Short summary

Cited articles

Abatzoglou, J. T., Williams, A. P., Boschetti, L., Zubkova, M., and Kolden, C. A.: Global patterns of interannual climate-fire relationships, Glob. Change Biol., 24, 5164–5175, https://doi.org/10.1111/gcb.14405, 2018. 
Alexander, M. E. and de Groot, W. J.: Fire behavior in jack pine stands as related to the Canadian Forest Fire Weather Index (FWI) System, Canadian Forestry Service, Northwest Region, Edmonton, Canada, 1988. 
Arino, O., Perez, R., Julio, J., Kalogirou, V., Bontemps, S., Defourny, P., and Van Bogaert, E.: Global Land Cover Map for 2009 (GlobCover 2009), European Space Agency (ESA) & Universite catholique de Louvain (UCL), PANGAEA, https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.787668, 2012. 
Bedia, J., Herrera, S., Gutiérrez, J. M., Zavala, G., Urbieta, I. R., and Moreno, J. M.: Sensitivity of fire weather index to different reanalysis products in the Iberian Peninsula, Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 12, 699–708, https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-12-699-2012, 2012. 
Bedia, J., Golding, N., Casanueva, A., Iturbide, M., Buontempo, C., and Gutiérrez, J. M.: Seasonal predictions of Fire Weather Index: Paving the way for their operational applicability in Mediterranean Europe, Climate Services, 9, 101–110, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cliser.2017.04.001, 2018. 
Short summary
This paper compares fire weather indices calculated from the NASA MERRA-2 reanlaysis to those calculated from a global network of weather stations, finding that, globally, biases in reanalysis fire weather are influenced firstly by temperature and relative humidity and, in certain regions, by precipitation biases. Fire weather forecasts using short-term NASA GEOS-5 weather forecasts are skillful 2 d ahead of time. This skill decreases more quickly with longer lead times at high latitudes.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint