Articles | Volume 16, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 2347–2350, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-2347-2016
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 2347–2350, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-2347-2016

Brief communication 08 Nov 2016

Brief communication | 08 Nov 2016

Brief communication: Loss and damage from a catastrophic landslide in Nepal

Kees van der Geest and Markus Schindler

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Cited articles

Dahal, R. K. and Hasegawa, S.: Representative rainfall thresholds for landslides in the Nepal Himalaya, Geomorphology, 100, 429–443, 2008.
Huggel, C., Clague, J. J., and Korup, O.: Is climate change responsible for changing landslide activity in high mountains?, Earth Surf. Proc. Land., 37, 77–91, 2012.
James, R., Otto, F., Parker, H., Boyd, E., Cornforth, R., Mitchell, D., and Allen, M.: Characterizing loss and damage from climate change, Nat. Clim. Change, 4, 938–939, 2014.
Parker, H. R., Cornforth, R. J., Boyd, E., James, R., Otto, F. E., and Allen, M. R.: Implications of event attribution for loss and damage policy, Weather, 70, 268–273, 2015.
Petley, D. N., Hearn, G. J., Hart, A., Rosser, N. J., Dunning, S. A., Oven, K., and Mitchell, W. A.: Trends in landslide occurrence in Nepal, Nat. Hazards, 43, 36–37, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-006-9100-3, 2007.
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Short summary
August 2014 saw a major landslide strike in a densely populated district 80 km northeast of Kathmandu, in Sindhupalchok district. This study combines evidence from surveys and interviews to assess impacts and preventive and coping measures taken. The impacts relative to annual income show that lower-income households lost up to 14 times their annual income, as opposed to 3 times for the wealthier. The implications of these findings for discussions surrounding loss and damage are discussed.
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