Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 2635–2665, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-2635-2019
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 2635–2665, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-2635-2019

Research article 25 Nov 2019

Research article | 25 Nov 2019

Meteorological conditions leading to the 2015 Salgar flash flood: lessons for vulnerable regions in tropical complex terrain

Carlos D. Hoyos et al.

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Cited articles

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On the morning of 18 May 2015, a flash flood in the La Liboriana river basin inundated the town of Salgar, killing more than 100 people. The ultimate goal of science, regarding risk management, is to be able to reduce the number of people affected by severe storms. Our goal is to identify the meteorological conditions that led to the flood, assess the characteristics of the rainfall events before the disaster, and identify lessons for vulnerable regions settled in complex terrains.
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