Articles | Volume 20, issue 3
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 783–796, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-783-2020

Special issue: Advances in extreme value analysis and application to natural...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 783–796, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-783-2020
Research article
24 Mar 2020
Research article | 24 Mar 2020

Spatial and temporal analysis of extreme storm-tide and skew-surge events around the coastline of New Zealand

Scott A. Stephens et al.

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Cited articles

Batstone, C., Lawless, M., Tawn, J., Horsburgh, K., Blackman, D., McMillan, A., Worth, D., Laeger, S., and Hunt, T.: A UK best-practice approach for extreme sea-level analysis along complex topographic coastlines, Ocean Eng., 71, 28–39, 2013. 
Bell, R. G.: Tidal exceedances, storm tides and the effect of sea-level rise, Proceedings of the 17th Congress of the Asia and Pacific division of the IAHR, Auckland, New Zealand, 10, 2010. 
Bell, R. G. and Goring, D. G.: Seasonal variability of sea level and sea-surface temperature on the north-east coast of New Zealand, Estuar. Coast. Shelf S., 47, 307–318, 1998. 
Bernier, N. B. and Thompson, K. R.: Predicting the frequency of storm surges and extreme sea levels in the northwest Atlantic, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 111, 10009–10009, 2006. 
Bernier, N. B. and Thompson, K. R.: Tide-surge interaction off the east coast of Canada and northeastern United States, J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans, 112, 6008–6008, 2007. 
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Short summary
Extreme sea levels in New Zealand occur in nearby places and at similar times, which means that flooding impacts and losses may be linked in space and time. The most extreme sea levels depend on storms coinciding with very high tides because storm surges are relatively small in New Zealand. The type of storm weather system influences where the extreme sea levels occur, and the annual timing is influenced by the low-amplitude (~10 cm) annual sea-level cycle.
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