Articles | Volume 20, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 3215–3224, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-3215-2020

Special issue: Remote sensing and Earth observation data in natural hazard...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 3215–3224, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-3215-2020

Research article 27 Nov 2020

Research article | 27 Nov 2020

Detecting precursors of an imminent landslide along the Jinsha River

Wentao Yang et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (03 Aug 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
AR by Wentao Yang on behalf of the Authors (23 Aug 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (24 Aug 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (05 Sep 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (01 Oct 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (04 Oct 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
AR by Wentao Yang on behalf of the Authors (13 Oct 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (15 Oct 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
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Short summary
We analysed deformation of a moving slope along the Jinsha River from November 2015 to November 2019. The slope is 80 km downstream from the famous Baige landslide, which caused two mega floods affecting downstream communities. This slope was relatively stable for the first 3 years (2015–2018) but moved significantly in the last year (2018–2019). The deformation is linked to seasonal precipitation. If this slope continues to slide downwards, it may have similar impacts to the Baige landslide.
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