Articles | Volume 22, issue 9
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2891–2920, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-2891-2022

Special issue: Hydro-meteorological extremes and hazards: vulnerability,...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2891–2920, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-2891-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
02 Sep 2022
Research article  | Highlight paper | 02 Sep 2022

Comprehensive space–time hydrometeorological simulations for estimating very rare floods at multiple sites in a large river basin

Daniel Viviroli et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2022-99', Anonymous Referee #1, 02 May 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Daniel Viviroli, 02 Jul 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2022-99', Anonymous Referee #2, 13 Jun 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Daniel Viviroli, 02 Jul 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Jul 2022) by Francesco Marra
AR by Daniel Viviroli on behalf of the Authors (04 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (05 Jul 2022) by Francesco Marra
ED: Publish as is (18 Jul 2022) by Paolo Tarolli(Executive Editor)
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Executive editor
This paper is very relevant for science but also society: the paper presents an approach for estimating rare to very rare floods at multiple sites in a large river basin. Compared to statistical approaches based on streamflow observations, the Continuous Simulation (CS) approach has substantial advantages in that it explicitly considers important processes of flood generation such as soil moisture, snow accumulation and snowmelt, and in addition can implement lake regulation, dam operation as well as lake and floodplain retention
Short summary
Estimating the magnitude of rare to very rare floods is a challenging task due to a lack of sufficiently long observations. The challenge is even greater in large river basins, where precipitation patterns and amounts differ considerably between individual events and floods from different parts of the basin coincide. We show that a hydrometeorological model chain can provide plausible estimates in this setting and can thus inform flood risk and safety assessments for critical infrastructure.
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