Articles | Volume 20, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 2961–2977, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-2961-2020

Special issue: Advances in extreme value analysis and application to natural...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 2961–2977, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-2961-2020
Research article
06 Nov 2020
Research article | 06 Nov 2020

Non-stationary extreme value analysis of ground snow loads in the French Alps: a comparison with building standards

Erwan Le Roux et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (23 Jun 2020) by Ivan Haigh
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (10 Jul 2020) by Ivan Haigh
AR by Erwan Le Roux on behalf of the Authors (30 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (10 Aug 2020) by Ivan Haigh
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Aug 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (07 Sep 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Sep 2020) by Ivan Haigh
AR by Erwan Le Roux on behalf of the Authors (09 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (25 Sep 2020) by Ivan Haigh
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Short summary
To minimize the risk of structure collapse due to extreme snow loads, structure standards rely on 50-year return levels of ground snow load (GSL), i.e. levels exceeded once every 50 years on average, that do not account for climate change. We study GSL data in the French Alps massifs from 1959 and 2019 and find that these 50-year return levels are decreasing with time between 900 and 4800 m of altitude, but they still exceed return levels of structure standards for half of the massifs at 1800 m.
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