Articles | Volume 21, issue 8
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 2643–2678, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-2643-2021

Special issue: Venice flooding: understanding, prediction capabilities, and...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 2643–2678, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-2643-2021

Review article 01 Sep 2021

Review article | 01 Sep 2021

Sea-level rise in Venice: historic and future trends (review article)

Davide Zanchettin et al.

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (18 Feb 2021) by Uwe Ulbrich
AR by Davide Zanchettin on behalf of the Authors (30 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 Apr 2021) by Uwe Ulbrich
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Apr 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (16 Apr 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (12 May 2021) by Uwe Ulbrich
AR by Davide Zanchettin on behalf of the Authors (20 Jun 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (02 Jul 2021) by Uwe Ulbrich
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (20 Jul 2021)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Jul 2021) by Uwe Ulbrich
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Jul 2021) by Uwe Ulbrich(Executive Editor)
Short summary
Relative sea level in Venice rose by about 2.5 mm/year in the past 150 years due to the combined effect of subsidence and mean sea-level rise. We estimate the likely range of mean sea-level rise in Venice by 2100 due to climate changes to be between about 10 and 110 cm, with an improbable yet possible high-end scenario of about 170 cm. Projections of subsidence are not available, but historical evidence demonstrates that they can increase the hazard posed by climatically induced sea-level rise.
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