Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 709–727, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-709-2018

Special issue: The use of remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS) in monitoring...

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 709–727, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-709-2018

Research article 05 Mar 2018

Research article | 05 Mar 2018

Geomorphological evolution of landslides near an active normal fault in northern Taiwan, as revealed by lidar and unmanned aircraft system data

Kuo-Jen Chang et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by Editor and Referees) (17 Oct 2017) by Yuichi S. Hayakawa
AR by Kuo-Jen Chang on behalf of the Authors (26 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Dec 2017) by Yuichi S. Hayakawa
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (15 Dec 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (25 Dec 2017) by Yuichi S. Hayakawa
AR by Kuo-Jen Chang on behalf of the Authors (03 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (29 Jan 2018) by Yuichi S. Hayakawa
AR by Kuo-Jen Chang on behalf of the Authors (29 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Several remote sensing techniques, i.e., aerial photographs, drone images, and airborne lidar, were used in this study to decipher the morphological features of obscure landslides in volcanic regions and how the observed features may be used for understanding landslide occurrence, subsequent geomorphological evolution, and potential hazards. Two large-scale landslides were characterized and quantified in this study.
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