Articles | Volume 22, issue 6
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1845-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-1845-2022
Research article
 | 
02 Jun 2022
Research article |  | 02 Jun 2022

More than heavy rain turning into fast-flowing water – a landscape perspective on the 2021 Eifel floods

Michael Dietze, Rainer Bell, Ugur Ozturk, Kristen L. Cook, Christoff Andermann, Alexander R. Beer, Bodo Damm, Ana Lucia, Felix S. Fauer, Katrin M. Nissen, Tobias Sieg, and Annegret H. Thieken

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Cited articles

Anderson, R. and Anderson, S.: Geomorphology: The Mechanics and Chemistry of Landscapes, Cambridge University Press, ISBN-10 0521519780, 2010. a, b
Baudrick, C. and Grant, G.: When do logs move in rivers, Water Resour. Res., 36, 571–583, 2000. a
BBK-DLR: Bundesamt für Bevölkerungsschutz und Katastrophenhilfe, Deutsches Institut für Luft- und Raumfahrt, https://arcgis.bbk.itzbund.de/arcgis/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=30835aae740e46a59df390eb6192c3bb&center=6.672,50.903, last access: 11 February 2022. a, b, c, d, e, f, g
Bell, F.: Environmental and engineering Geology, Whittles Pub. Ltd., ISBN-10 1849951241, 2007. a
Bell, R., Dietze, M., Thieken, A., Cook, K., Andermann, C., Beer, A., Vela, A. L., Ries, J. B., Brell, M., Eltner, A., Roessner, S., Schrott, L., Iserloh, T., Seeger, M., and Öztürk, U.: More than just fast flowing water: the landscape impact of the July 2021 west Germany flood, EGU General Assembly 2022, Vienna, Austria, 23–27 May 2022, EGU22-11641, https://doi.org/10.5194/egusphere-egu22-11641, 2022. a
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Short summary
The flood that hit Europe in July 2021, specifically the Eifel, Germany, was more than a lot of fast-flowing water. The heavy rain that fell during the 3 d before also caused the slope to fail, recruited tree trunks that clogged bridges, and routed debris across the landscape. Especially in the upper parts of the catchments the flood was able to gain momentum. Here, we discuss how different landscape elements interacted and highlight the challenges of holistic future flood anticipation.
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