Articles | Volume 21, issue 6
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 1921–1933, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-1921-2021
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 1921–1933, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-1921-2021

Research article 18 Jun 2021

Research article | 18 Jun 2021

Global ground strike point characteristics in negative downward lightning flashes – Part 2: Algorithm validation

Dieter R. Poelman et al.

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Revised manuscript accepted for NHESS
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Cited articles

Balch, J. K., Bradley, B. A., Abatzoglou, J. T., Nagy, R. C., Fusco, E. J., and Mahood, A. L.: Human-started wildfires expand the fire niche across the United States, P. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 114, 1946–2951, 2017. 
Ballarotti, M. G., Saba, M. M. F., and Pinto Jr., O.: A new perfomance evaluation of the Brazilian Lightning Location System (RINDAT) based on high-speed camera observations of natural negative ground flashes, proc. 19th Int. Lightning Detection Conf. (ILDC), Tucson, Az, Vaisala, 2006. 
Biagi, C. J., Cummins, K. L., Kehoe, K. E., and Krider, E. P.: National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) performance in southern Arizona, Texas, and Oklahoma in 2003–2004, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D05208, https://doi.org/10.1029/2006JD007341, 2007. 
Campos, L. Z. S.: On the mechanisms that lead to multiple ground contacts in lightning, Doctorate Thesis of the Graduate Course in Space Geophysics, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas eEpaciais (INPE), Chapter 4, available at: http://urlib.net/8JMKD3MGP3W34P/3LG4CDL (last access: June 2021), 2016. 
Campos, L. Z. S., Cummins, K. L., and Pinto Jr., O.: An algorithm for identifying ground strike points from return stroke data provided by lightning location systems, Asia-Pacific Conference on Lightning (APL), Nagoya, Japan, 2015. 
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Short summary
The lightning flash density is a key input parameter for assessing the risk of occurrence of a lightning strike. Flashes tend to have more than one ground termination point on average; therefore the use of ground strike point densities is more appropriate. The aim of this study is to assess the ability of three distinct ground strike point algorithms to correctly determine the observed ground-truth strike points.
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