Articles | Volume 19, issue 5
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 1067–1086, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-1067-2019
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 1067–1086, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-1067-2019

Research article 21 May 2019

Research article | 21 May 2019

Atmospheric circulation changes and their impact on extreme sea levels around Australia

Frank Colberg et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (23 Oct 2018) by Joaquim G. Pinto
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (07 Jan 2019)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Jan 2019) by Joaquim G. Pinto
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (19 Jan 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (28 Jan 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (31 Jan 2019) by Joaquim G. Pinto
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (14 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (19 Feb 2019) by Joaquim G. Pinto
AR by Ron Hoeke on behalf of the Authors (27 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript

Post-review adjustments

AA: Author's adjustment | EA: Editor approval
AA by Ron Hoeke on behalf of the Authors (02 May 2019)   Author's adjustment   Manuscript
EA: Adjustments approved (06 May 2019) by Joaquim G. Pinto
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Short summary
This study investigates coastal sea level variability and extremes around Australia, taking into account historical conditions and future atmospheric changes. Modelling suggests changes in future extreme sea levels may occur. A southward movement of the subtropical ridge leads to reduced sea level extremes in many areas, while changes over the Gulf of Carpentaria are largest and positive during austral summer in two of four simulations, likely associated with changes in the northwest monsoon.
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