Articles | Volume 21, issue 3
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 961–976, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-961-2021
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 961–976, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-961-2021

Research article 12 Mar 2021

Research article | 12 Mar 2021

The impact of hydrological model structure on the simulation of extreme runoff events

Gijs van Kempen et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (04 Oct 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (27 Nov 2020)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (29 Nov 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (11 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (17 Dec 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (17 Dec 2020) by Paolo Tarolli
AR by Gijs van Kempen on behalf of the Authors (21 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (03 Jan 2021) by Paolo Tarolli
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Short summary
In this study, we combine climate model results with a hydrological model to investigate uncertainties in flood and drought risk. With the climate model, 2000 years of current climate was created. The hydrological model consisted of several building blocks that we could adapt. In this way, we could investigate the effect of these hydrological building blocks on high- and low-flow risk in four different climate zones with return periods of up to 500 years.
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