Articles | Volume 20, issue 11
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-3083-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-3083-2020
Research article
 | 
16 Nov 2020
Research article |  | 16 Nov 2020

The contribution of air temperature and ozone to mortality rates during hot weather episodes in eight German cities during the years 2000 and 2017

Alexander Krug, Daniel Fenner, Hans-Guido Mücke, and Dieter Scherer

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Latest update: 23 May 2024
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Short summary
This study investigates hot weather episodes in eight German cities which are statistically associated with increased mortality. Besides air temperature, ozone concentrations partly explain these mortality rates. The strength of the respective contributions of the two stressors varies across the cities. Results highlight that during hot weather episodes, not only high air temperature affects urban populations; concurrently high ozone concentrations also play an important role in public health.
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