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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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NHESS | Articles | Volume 20, issue 5
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1497–1511, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-1497-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1497–1511, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-20-1497-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 27 May 2020

Research article | 27 May 2020

Evolution of a pyrocumulonimbus event associated with an extreme wildfire in Tasmania, Australia

Mercy N. Ndalila et al.

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Short summary
We analyse the evolution of a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb), or fire-induced thunderstorm, during the Forcett–Dunalley fire on 4 January 2013 and relate it to the prevailing fire weather and fire severity patterns. We show that the pyroCb reached an altitude of 15 km, was associated with elevated fire weather, and formed over a severely burned area. Additionally, we show that eastern Tasmania is prone to elevated fire weather which has implications for fire weather forecasting and fire management.
We analyse the evolution of a pyrocumulonimbus (pyroCb), or fire-induced thunderstorm, during...
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