Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 2385–2404, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-2385-2019
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 2385–2404, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-2385-2019

Research article 30 Oct 2019

Research article | 30 Oct 2019

Simulation of fragmental rockfalls detected using terrestrial laser scans from rock slopes in south-central British Columbia, Canada

Zac Sala et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (19 May 2019) by Oded Katz
AR by Zac Sala on behalf of the Authors (05 Jun 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (27 Jun 2019) by Oded Katz
AR by Zac Sala on behalf of the Authors (18 Jul 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (25 Jul 2019) by Oded Katz
AR by Zac Sala on behalf of the Authors (02 Aug 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The work carried out for this study is part of a collaborative research program studying the impact of ground hazards on transportation infrastructure in Canada. The focus of the paper is the testing and application of a new simulation technique which can model the movement of falling rock material. These initial tests show that our simulation technique is capable of reproducing material accumulations from rockfall events which occurred above a section of railway in British Columbia, Canada.
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