Articles | Volume 18, issue 3
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 889–906, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-889-2018

Special issue: Damage of natural hazards: assessment and mitigation

Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 889–906, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-889-2018

Research article 20 Mar 2018

Research article | 20 Mar 2018

The effect of soil moisture anomalies on maize yield in Germany

Michael Peichl et al.

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Revised manuscript accepted for HESS
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Cited articles

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Crop yields are routinely derived from meteorological variables, especially temperature. However, the primary water source for plant growth (soil moisture) is neglected. In this study, the predictability of maize yield is investigated using soil moisture or meteorological variables in Germany. The effects of soil moisture dominate those of temperature and are time-dependent. For example, comparatively moist soil conditions in June reduce crop yields, while in August they increase yields.
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