Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-287
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-287

  21 Oct 2021

21 Oct 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Brief Communication: A case study of risk assessment for facilities associated with earthquake-induced liquefaction potential in Kimhae City, South Korea 

Sang-Soo Jeon1, Daeyang Heo2, and Sang-Seung Lee3 Sang-Soo Jeon et al.
  • 1Department of Civil & Urban Engineering, Construction Technology Research Center, INJE University, Inje-ro 197, Kimhae City, Gyeongsangnam-do, 50834, South Korea
  • 2Industrial Site Division, Gyeongsangnam-do Provincial Government, 200 Jungangdae-ro, Uichang-gu, Changwon City, Gyeongsangnam-do, 51154, South Korea
  • 3Kyong-Ho Engineering, Kyongho Building, 41 Cheyukgwan-ro 74 Beon-gil, Guri, Gyeonggi-Do, 11940, South Korea

Abstract. Liquefaction causes secondary damage after earthquakes; however, liquefaction related phenomena were rarely reported until after the Mw = 5.4 November 15, 2017 Pohang earthquake in Korea. Both the Mw = 5.8 September 12, 2016 Gyeongju earthquake and Mw = 5.4 November 15, 2017 Pohang earthquake occurred in the fault zone of Yangsan City (located in the south-eastern part of Korea), and both of these earthquakes induced liquefaction. Moreover, they demonstrated that Korea is not safe against the liquefaction induced by earthquakes. In this study, estimations and calculations were performed based on the distances between the centroids of administrative districts and an epicenter located at the Yangsan Fault, the peak ground accelerations (PGAs) induced by Mw = 5.0 and 6.5 earthquakes, and a liquefaction potential index (LPI) calculated based on groundwater level and standard penetration test results from 274 locations in Kimhae City (adjacent to the Nakdong river and across the Yangsan Fault). Then, a kriging method using geographical information systems was used to evaluate the liquefaction effects on the risk levels of facilities. The results indicate that a Mw = 5.0 earthquake induces a small and low level of liquefaction, resulting in slight risk for facilities, but a Mw = 6.5 earthquake induces a large and high level of liquefaction, resulting in a severe risk for facilities.

Sang-Soo Jeon et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2021-287', Anonymous Referee #1, 09 Nov 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2021-287', Anonymous Referee #2, 12 Nov 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on nhess-2021-287', Anonymous Referee #3, 28 Nov 2021

Sang-Soo Jeon et al.

Sang-Soo Jeon et al.

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Short summary
Liquefaction causes secondary damage after earthquakes; however, liquefaction related phenomena were rarely reported in Korea. They demonstrated that Korea is not safe against the liquefaction induced by earthquakes. The results indicate that a Mw = 5.0 earthquake induces a small and low level of liquefaction, resulting in slight risk for facilities, but a Mw = 6.5 earthquake induces a large and high level of liquefaction, resulting in a severe risk for facilities.
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