Articles | Volume 22, issue 3
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-869-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-869-2022
Research article
 | 
16 Mar 2022
Research article |  | 16 Mar 2022

Monitoring the daily evolution and extent of snow drought

Benjamin J. Hatchett, Alan M. Rhoades, and Daniel J. McEvoy

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Latest update: 22 Jul 2024
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Short summary
Snow droughts, or below-average snowpack, can result from either dry conditions and/or rainfall instead of snowfall. Monitoring snow drought through time and across space is important to evaluate when snow drought onset occurred, its duration, spatial extent, and severity as well as what conditions created it or led to its termination. We present visualization techniques, including a web-based snow-drought-tracking tool, to evaluate snow droughts and assess their impacts in the western US.
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