Articles | Volume 22, issue 7
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2433–2443, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-2433-2022
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2433–2443, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-22-2433-2022
Research article
25 Jul 2022
Research article | 25 Jul 2022

Full-scale experiments to examine the role of deadwood in rockfall dynamics in forests

Adrian Ringenbach et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2021-319', Franck Bourrier, 10 Jan 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2021-319', Anonymous Referee #2, 26 Feb 2022

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (02 Apr 2022) by Paolo Tarolli
AR by Adrian Ringenbach on behalf of the Authors (11 Apr 2022)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (01 May 2022) by Paolo Tarolli
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (09 Jun 2022)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (19 Jun 2022)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Jun 2022) by Paolo Tarolli
AR by Adrian Ringenbach on behalf of the Authors (01 Jul 2022)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
Forests have a recognized braking effect on rockfalls. The impact of lying deadwood, however, is mainly neglected. We conducted 1 : 1-scale rockfall experiments in three different states of a spruce forest to fill this knowledge gap: the original forest, the forest including lying deadwood and the cleared area. The deposition points clearly show that deadwood has a protective effect. We reproduced those experimental results numerically, considering three-dimensional cones to be deadwood.
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