Articles | Volume 21, issue 6
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 1971–1982, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-1971-2021
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 1971–1982, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-21-1971-2021

Research article 30 Jun 2021

Research article | 30 Jun 2021

Assessing local impacts of the 1700 CE Cascadia earthquake and tsunami using tree-ring growth histories: a case study in South Beach, Oregon, USA

Robert P. Dziak et al.

Viewed

Total article views: 1,817 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
1,380 409 28 1,817 9 11
  • HTML: 1,380
  • PDF: 409
  • XML: 28
  • Total: 1,817
  • BibTeX: 9
  • EndNote: 11
Views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jan 2021)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 27 Jan 2021)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 1,634 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 1,633 with geography defined and 1 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Discussed (final revised paper)

Latest update: 20 Oct 2021
Download
Short summary
On 26 January 1700 CE, a massive earthquake and tsunami struck the US Pacific Northwest west coast. The tsunami caused severe damage to coastal forests in Washington State. However, evidence of the impact on coastal Oregon trees has been difficult to find. We present some of the first evidence of tree-ring growth changes caused by the 1700 tsunami from an old-growth Douglas-fir stand located in South Beach, Oregon. We also present a tsunami inundation model of the 1700 earthquake.
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint