Articles | Volume 16, issue 7
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 1629–1638, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-1629-2016
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 16, 1629–1638, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-16-1629-2016

Research article 20 Jul 2016

Research article | 20 Jul 2016

Mangrove forest against dyke-break-induced tsunami on rapidly subsiding coasts

Hiroshi Takagi et al.

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Short summary
Thin coastal dykes found in developing countries may suddenly collapse due to land subsidence, material ageing, earthquakes, a collision with vessels, etc. Such a failure could trigger a dyke-break-induced tsunami. To analyse the potential consequences of such a flooding event, a hydrodynamic model was created using the data from the authors' field surveys of a vulnerable coastal community in Jakarta. The countermeasure of using mangrove forest is also proposed to mitigate violent floods.
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