Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-139
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-139
19 May 2022
 | 19 May 2022
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Multi-hazard Tropical Cyclone Risk Assessment for Australia

Cameron Do and Yuriy Kuleshov

Abstract. Tropical cyclones (TCs) have long posed a significant threat to Australia's population, infrastructure, and natural environment. This threat may grow under climate change as projections indicate continuing sea level rise and increases in rainfall during TC events. Previous TC risk reduction efforts have focused on the risk from wind alone, whereas a holistic approach requires multi-hazard risk assessments that also consider impacts of other TC-related hazards. This study assessed and mapped TC risk nationwide, focusing on the impacts on population and infrastructure from the TC-related hazards of wind, storm surge, flooding and landslides. Risk maps were created at the Local Government Area (LGA) level for all of Australia, using collated data on multiple hazards, exposure and vulnerability. The study demonstrated that the risk posed by all hazards was highest for coastal LGAs of eastern Queensland and New South Wales followed by medium risk across Northern Territory and north-west of Western Australia, with flood and landslide hazards also affecting several inland LGAs. The resulting maps of risk will provide decision-makers with the information needed to further reduce TC risk, save lives, protect the environment, and reduce economic losses.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Cameron Do and Yuriy Kuleshov

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2022-139', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Jul 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Y. Kuleshov, 05 Sep 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2022-139', Anonymous Referee #2, 20 Jul 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Y. Kuleshov, 05 Sep 2022

Interactive discussion

Status: closed

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2022-139', Anonymous Referee #1, 15 Jul 2022
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Y. Kuleshov, 05 Sep 2022
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2022-139', Anonymous Referee #2, 20 Jul 2022
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Y. Kuleshov, 05 Sep 2022
Cameron Do and Yuriy Kuleshov
Cameron Do and Yuriy Kuleshov

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Latest update: 09 May 2024
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This preprint has been withdrawn.

Short summary
Tropical cyclone (TC) risk over Australia was assessed focusing on the impacts on population and infrastructure from hazards of wind, storm surge, flooding and landslides. The risk posed by all hazards was highest for coastal areas of east, north and north-west of Australia, with flood and landslide hazards also affecting several inland areas. The resulting maps of risk will provide decision-makers with the information needed to further reduce TC risk, save lives, and reduce economic losses.
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