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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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In the current study (N = 118), we found evidence for a buffering effect of community resilience (as a form of social support) on post-disaster mental health and life satisfaction. Our work shows that previous work might have underestimated the effect of social support on post-disaster adjustment. Applying (statistical) moderator analysis, the current work contributes to the discussion of the role of social factors for mental health outcomes of flooding.
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NHESS | Articles | Volume 19, issue 11
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 2371–2384, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-2371-2019
Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 19, 2371–2384, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-19-2371-2019

Research article 30 Oct 2019

Research article | 30 Oct 2019

“We can help ourselves”: does community resilience buffer against the negative impact of flooding on mental health?

Torsten Masson et al.

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Latest update: 24 Jan 2021
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
In the current study (N = 118), we found evidence for a buffering effect of community resilience (as a form of social support) on post-disaster mental health and life satisfaction. Our work shows that previous work might have underestimated the effect of social support on post-disaster adjustment. Applying (statistical) moderator analysis, the current work contributes to the discussion of the role of social factors for mental health outcomes of flooding.
Citation
Altmetrics
Final-revised paper
Preprint