Articles | Volume 18, issue 6
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-1555-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-18-1555-2018
Research article
 | 
04 Jun 2018
Research article |  | 04 Jun 2018

A forensic re-analysis of one of the deadliest European tornadoes

Alois M. Holzer, Thomas M. E. Schreiner, and Tomáš Púčik

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Short summary
This study of a historical tornado that occurred about 100 years ago was motivated by the fact that rich photo material of the inflicted damage was available. It is important to rate particularly strong tornadoes, because their number is generally low, and statistics of the frequency for such events and the subsequent risk assessment heavily rely on a sound data basis. The tornado reached maximum winds of F4 intensity and caused 34 fatalities. A working method is presented for similar events.
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