Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-221
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-221

  23 Aug 2021

23 Aug 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Identification of Rip Current Hazards Using Fluorescent Dye And Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (A Case Study Of Drini Beach, Gunungkidul, Indonesia)

Hendy Fatchurohman1, Alfiatun Nur Khasanah1, and Ahmad Cahyadi2 Hendy Fatchurohman et al.
  • 1Department of Earth Science, Vocational College, Universitas Gadjah Mada. Sekip Utara Jalan Kaliurang, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281
  • 2Department of Environmental Geography, Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada. Sekip Utara Jalan Kaliurang, Bulaksumur, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, 55281

Abstract. Coastal tourism is a leading sector substantially contributing to the regional income of Gunungkidul Regency, Indonesia. However, with more tourists visiting the beach, more lives are threatened by coastal hazards. Rip currents are a channel of powerful, narrow, fast-moving water that can carry floating objects away from the shore, presenting one of the most common coastal hazards to swimmers. Unfortunately, most tourists are unaware of rip currents and their threats and how to avoid them. This study was designed to identify the types and dimensions of rip current in one of the regency’s tourist attractions, Drini Beach. For this purpose, an environmentally friendly fluorescent dye, Uranine, was injected from the shoreline, then the velocity and direction of its movements were observed from aerial video footage captured with a drone. Results showed stationary rip currents with a narrow channel, called a channel rip, with the mean dimensions: 250 m from the shoreline to the head and 10.25 m in width. A break in the reef flat can mostly generate rip currents at Drini Beach. It creates an area that is deeper than the surrounding reef flats through which water and the transported coastal sediments can flow easily offshore. Rip currents identified in this research provide the basis for disaster mitigation measures to reduce fatality.

Hendy Fatchurohman et al.

Status: open (until 18 Nov 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2021-221', Stephen Leatherman, 03 Sep 2021 reply
  • AC1: 'Comment on nhess-2021-221', Hendy Fatchurohman, 10 Sep 2021 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2021-221', Anonymous Referee #2, 21 Oct 2021 reply

Hendy Fatchurohman et al.

Hendy Fatchurohman et al.

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Short summary
Rip currents pose dangers to Drini Beach, as evident from the increasing number of tourists and records of those affected by marine accidents. Based on the current tracing, the beach has a channel rip, which is persistent stationary and is controlled by the bathymetric conditions. It develops in the break in the reef flats with sand substrates in its bottom and in the break that is deeper than the surrounding reef flats.
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