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https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-437
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2017-437
20 Dec 2017
 | 20 Dec 2017
Status: this preprint has been withdrawn by the authors.

Impacts of extreme weather events on transport infrastructure in Norway

Regula Frauenfelder, Anders Solheim, Ketil Isaksen, Bård Romstad, Anita V. Dyrrdal, Kristine H. H. Ekseth, Alf Harbitz, Carl B. Harbitz, Jan Erik Haugen, Hans Olav Hygen, Hilde Haakenstad, Christian Jaedicke, Árni Jónsson, Ronny Klæboe, Johanna Ludvigsen, Nele M. Meyer, Trude Rauken, Reidun G. Skaland, Kjetil Sverdrup-Thygeson, Asbjørn Aaheim, Heidi Bjordal, and Per-Anton Fevang

Abstract. This paper presents selected results of the interdisciplinary research project Impacts of extreme weather events on infrastructure in Norway (InfraRisk) carried out between 2010 to 2013, as part of the program NORKLIMA (2004 2013) of the Research Council of Norway (RCN). The project has systematized large amounts of existing data and generated new results that are important for our handling of risks associated with future extreme weather and natural hazards threatening the transport infrastructure in Norway. The results of the InfaRisk project range widely, from the establishment of trends in key weather elements to studies of human response to threats from extreme weather. The analyses of weather elements have provided a clearer understanding of the trends in the development of extreme weather. The studies are based on both historical data and available future scenarios (projections) from climate models. Compared to previous studies, we calculated changes in climate variables that are particularly important in relation to nature hazards. Overall, the analyses document an increase in frequency as well as intensity of both precipitation and wind. Results of projections show that the observed changes will continue throughout this century. We could also identify large regional differences, with some areas experiencing, e.g., a reduction in the intensity of heavy rainfall events. However, most of the country will experience the opposite, i.e., both increased intensity and increased frequency of heavy precipitation. Our analyses show that at least 27 per cent of Norwegian roads and 31 per cent of railroads are exposed to rock fall and snow avalanches hazards. The project has also assessed relationships between different parameters that can affect the likelihood of debris flows. Variables such as terrain slope and size of watercourses are important, while local climate, which varies widely in Norway, determines threshold values for rainfall that can trigger debris flows.

This preprint has been withdrawn.

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Regula Frauenfelder, Anders Solheim, Ketil Isaksen, Bård Romstad, Anita V. Dyrrdal, Kristine H. H. Ekseth, Alf Harbitz, Carl B. Harbitz, Jan Erik Haugen, Hans Olav Hygen, Hilde Haakenstad, Christian Jaedicke, Árni Jónsson, Ronny Klæboe, Johanna Ludvigsen, Nele M. Meyer, Trude Rauken, Reidun G. Skaland, Kjetil Sverdrup-Thygeson, Asbjørn Aaheim, Heidi Bjordal, and Per-Anton Fevang

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Regula Frauenfelder, Anders Solheim, Ketil Isaksen, Bård Romstad, Anita V. Dyrrdal, Kristine H. H. Ekseth, Alf Harbitz, Carl B. Harbitz, Jan Erik Haugen, Hans Olav Hygen, Hilde Haakenstad, Christian Jaedicke, Árni Jónsson, Ronny Klæboe, Johanna Ludvigsen, Nele M. Meyer, Trude Rauken, Reidun G. Skaland, Kjetil Sverdrup-Thygeson, Asbjørn Aaheim, Heidi Bjordal, and Per-Anton Fevang
Regula Frauenfelder, Anders Solheim, Ketil Isaksen, Bård Romstad, Anita V. Dyrrdal, Kristine H. H. Ekseth, Alf Harbitz, Carl B. Harbitz, Jan Erik Haugen, Hans Olav Hygen, Hilde Haakenstad, Christian Jaedicke, Árni Jónsson, Ronny Klæboe, Johanna Ludvigsen, Nele M. Meyer, Trude Rauken, Reidun G. Skaland, Kjetil Sverdrup-Thygeson, Asbjørn Aaheim, Heidi Bjordal, and Per-Anton Fevang

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Short summary
We present results from the project Impacts of extreme weather events on infrastructure in Norway. Our analyses document an increase in frequency and intensity of e.g. precipitation and wind during the last decades, and that these observed changes will continue throughout the 21st century. We could show that ≥ 27 % of main roads and 31 % of railroads are exposed to rockfall and avalanches. Pro-actively facing such risks will increase resilience and cost-efficiency of the transport infrastructure.
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