Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2023-225
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2023-225
05 Jan 2024
 | 05 Jan 2024
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Volcanic risk ranking and regional mapping of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes

Maria-Paz Reyes-Hardy, Luigia Sara Di Maio, Lucia Dominguez, Corine Frischknecht, Sébastien Biass, Leticia Guimarães, Amiel Nieto-Torres, Manuela Elissondo, Gabriela Pedreros, Rigoberto Aguilar, Álvaro Amigo, Sebastián García, Pablo Forte, and Costanza Bonadonna

Abstract. The Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes (CVZA) extends from southern Peru, through the altiplano of Bolivia, to Puna de Atacama of northern Chile and Argentina, between latitudes 14–28° S of the Andean cordillera, with altitudes raising up to more than 4,000 m above sea level. Given the large number of active volcanoes in this area, which are often located close to both urban areas and critical infrastructure, prioritization of volcanic risk reduction strategies is crucial. However, the identification of hazardous active volcanoes is challenging due to the limited accessibility. Here, we identify the riskiest volcanoes based on complementary strategies including i) a regional mapping based on volcanic hazard parameters and surrounding density of elements at risk combined with ii) the application of the recently developed Volcanic Risk Ranking methodology that integrates hazard, exposure and vulnerability as factors that increase risk, and resilience as a factor that reduces risk. The method identifies 59 active and potentially active volcanoes that not only highlights the volcanic centers with the most intense and frequent volcanic eruptions (e.g., El Misti and Ubinas volcanoes (Peru)) and the highest density of exposed elements (e.g., the cities of Arequipa and Mequegua (Peru)), but also those with the highest potential impact requiring risk mitigation actions (i.e., Cerro Blanco (Argentina), Yucamane, Huaynaputina, Tutupaca, and Ticsani (Peru)).

Maria-Paz Reyes-Hardy, Luigia Sara Di Maio, Lucia Dominguez, Corine Frischknecht, Sébastien Biass, Leticia Guimarães, Amiel Nieto-Torres, Manuela Elissondo, Gabriela Pedreros, Rigoberto Aguilar, Álvaro Amigo, Sebastián García, Pablo Forte, and Costanza Bonadonna

Status: open (until 29 Mar 2024)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
Maria-Paz Reyes-Hardy, Luigia Sara Di Maio, Lucia Dominguez, Corine Frischknecht, Sébastien Biass, Leticia Guimarães, Amiel Nieto-Torres, Manuela Elissondo, Gabriela Pedreros, Rigoberto Aguilar, Álvaro Amigo, Sebastián García, Pablo Forte, and Costanza Bonadonna

Data sets

Active and potentially active volcanoes of the Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes (CVZA) Maria-Paz Reyes-Hardy, Luigia Sara Di Maio, Lucia Dominguez, Corine Frischknecht, Sébastien Biass, Leticia Guimarães, Amiel Nieto-Torres, Manuela Elissondo, Gabriela Pedreros, Rigoberto Aguilar, Álvaro Amigo, Sebastián García, Pablo Forte, and Costanza Bonadonna https://archive-ouverte.unige.ch//unige:172413

Maria-Paz Reyes-Hardy, Luigia Sara Di Maio, Lucia Dominguez, Corine Frischknecht, Sébastien Biass, Leticia Guimarães, Amiel Nieto-Torres, Manuela Elissondo, Gabriela Pedreros, Rigoberto Aguilar, Álvaro Amigo, Sebastián García, Pablo Forte, and Costanza Bonadonna

Viewed

Total article views: 336 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
288 38 10 336 18 7 4
  • HTML: 288
  • PDF: 38
  • XML: 10
  • Total: 336
  • Supplement: 18
  • BibTeX: 7
  • EndNote: 4
Views and downloads (calculated since 05 Jan 2024)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 05 Jan 2024)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 333 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 333 with geography defined and 0 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 
Latest update: 03 Mar 2024
Download
Short summary
The Central Volcanic Zone of the Andes is shared by four countries and groups 59 volcanoes. We identified the ones with the most intense and frequent eruptions (e.g., El Misti and Ubinas), the cities with the highest density of elements at risk (e.g., Arequipa and Mequegua), and the volcanoes with the highest potential impact (e.g., Cerro Blanco and Yucamane). Our study contributes into the prioritization of risk reduction resources, which is crucial for surrounding communities.
Altmetrics