Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-117
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2022-117
 
19 Apr 2022
19 Apr 2022
Status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Simulation of tsunami induced by a submarine landslide in a glaciomarine margin: the case of Storfjorden SL1 landslide (Southwestern of the Svalbard Islands)

María Teresa Pedrosa-González1, José Manuel González-Vida2, Jesús Galindo-Záldivar1,4, Sergio Ortega2, Manuel Jesús Castro3, David Casas5, and Gemma Ercilla5 María Teresa Pedrosa-González et al.
  • 1Departamento de Geodinámica, Universidad de Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
  • 2Departamento de Matemática Aplicada, Escuela de Ingenierías Industriales, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain
  • 3Departamento de Análisis Matemática, Estadística e I.O y Matemática Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga, Spain
  • 4Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de La Tierra (CSIC-UGR), Granada, Spain Instituto Andaluz de Ciencias de la Tierra (CSIC-UGR)
  • 5Institut de Ciències del Mar, CSIC., 08003 Barcelona, Spain

Abstract. A modelling approach to understand the tsunamigenic potentiality of submarine landslides will provide new perspectives on tsunami hazard threat, mostly in polar margins where global climatic change and its related ocean warming may induce future landslides. Here, we use the Landslide L-ML-HySEA numerical model, including wave dispersion, to provide new insights in factors controlling the tsunami characteristics triggered by the Storfjorden SL1 landslide (Southwestern Svalbard). Tsunami waves, determined mainly by the sliding mechanism and the bathymetry, consist of two initial wave dipoles, with troughs to the northeast (Spitsbergen and towards the continent) and crests to the south (seawards) and southwest (Bear Island), reaching more than 3 m of amplitude above the landslide, and finally merging into a single wave dipole. The tsunami wave propagation and its coastal impact are governed by the Kveithola and Storfjorden glacial troughs, and by the bordering Spitsbergen Bank, which shape the continental shelf. This local bathymetry controls the direction of propagation with a crescent shape front, in plan view, and is responsible for shoaling effects amplitude values (-4.2 to 4.3 m), amplification (-3.7 to 4 m), diffraction of the tsunami waves, as well as influencing their coastal impact times.

María Teresa Pedrosa-González et al.

Status: open (until 31 May 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2022-117', Daniele Casalbore, 17 May 2022 reply
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2022-117', Dimitris Sakellariou, 22 May 2022 reply

María Teresa Pedrosa-González et al.

María Teresa Pedrosa-González et al.

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Short summary
The landslide multilayer HySEA numerical model of the tsunami triggered by the Storfjorden SL1 landslide provide new insights in factors like sliding mechanism and the bathymetry controlling the propagation, amplitude values, shoaling effects as well as coastal impact times. This case study will be useful to provide new perspectives on tsunami hazard assessment in polar margins, where global climatic change and its related ocean warming may contribute to landslide trigger.
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