Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-147
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-147

  10 Jun 2021

10 Jun 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Impact of information presentation on interpretability of spatial hazard information: Lessons from a study in avalanche safety

Kathryn C. Fisher1, Pascal Haegeli1, and Patrick Mair2 Kathryn C. Fisher et al.
  • 1School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, V5A 1S6, Canada
  • 2Dept. Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, 02138, United States

Abstract. Avalanche warning services publish avalanche condition reports, often called avalanche bulletins, to help backcountry recreationists make informed risk management decisions about when and where to travel in avalanche terrain. To be successful, the information presented in bulletins must be properly understood and applied prior to entering avalanche terrain. However, few avalanche bulletin elements have been empirically tested for their efficacy in communicating hazard information. The objective of this study is to explicitly test the effectiveness of three different graphics representing the aspect and elevation of avalanche problems on users’ ability to apply the information.

To address this question, we conducted an online survey that presented participants with one of three graphic renderings of avalanche problem information and asked them to rank a series of route options in order of their exposure to the described hazard. Following completion of route ranking tasks, users were presented with all three graphics and asked to rate how effective they thought the graphics were. Our analysis dataset included responses from 3,056 backcountry recreationists with a variety of backgrounds and avalanche safety training levels. Using a series of generalized linear mixed effects models, our analysis shows that a graphic format that combines the aspect and elevation information for each avalanche problem is the most effective graphic for helping users understand the avalanche hazard conditions because it resulted in higher success in picking the correct exposure ranking, faster completion times, and was rated by users to be the most effective. These results are consistent with existing research on the impact of graphics on cognitive load and can be applied by avalanche warning services to improve the communication of avalanche hazard to readers of their avalanche bulletins.

Kathryn C. Fisher et al.

Status: open (until 22 Jul 2021)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse

Kathryn C. Fisher et al.

Data sets

Impact of information presentation on interpretability of spatial hazard information: Lessons from a study in avalanche safety---Data and Code Haegeli, P., Fisher, K., and Mair, P. https://osf.io/myfp2

Model code and software

Impact of information presentation on interpretability of spatial hazard information: Lessons from a study in avalanche safety---Data and Code Haegeli, P., Fisher, K., and Mair, P. https://osf.io/myfp2

Kathryn C. Fisher et al.

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Short summary
Avalanche warning services publish condition reports to help backcountry recreationists make informed decisions about when and where to travel in avalanche terrain. We tested how different graphic representations of terrain information can affect users’ ability to interpret and apply the provided information. Our study shows that a combined presentation of aspect and elevation information is the most effective. These results can be used to improve avalanche risk communication products.
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