Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-118
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2021-118

  26 May 2021

26 May 2021

Review status: a revised version of this preprint is currently under review for the journal NHESS.

Distribution of coastal high water level during extreme events around the UK and Irish coasts

Julia Rulent1,2, Lucy M. Bricheno2, Mattias J. A. Green1, Ivan D. Haigh3, and Huw Lewis4 Julia Rulent et al.
  • 1School of Ocean Sciences, College of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Bangor University, Menai Bridge, United Kingdom
  • 2National Oceanography Centre, Liverpool, United Kingdom
  • 3School of Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom
  • 4Met Office, Exeter, United Kingdom

Abstract. The interaction between waves, surges and astronomical tides can lead to high coastal total water level (TWL), which can in turn lead to coastal flooding. Here, a high resolution (1.5 km) simulation from a UK-focused regional coupled environmental prediction system is used to investigate the extreme events of winter 2013/4 around the UK and Irish coasts. The aim is to analyse the spatial distribution of coastal TWL and its components during this period by assessing 1- the relative contribution of different TWL components around the coast, 2- how extreme waves, surges and tide interacted and if they occurred simultaneously 3- if this has implications in defining the severity of coastal hazard conditions. The TWL components’ coastal distribution in winter 2013/4 was not constant in space, impacting differently over different regions. High (> 90th percentile) waves and surges occurred simultaneously at any tidal stage, including high tide (7.7 % of cases), but more often over the flood tide. During periods of high flood risk a hazard proxy, defined as the sum of the sea surface height and half the significant wave height, at least doubled from average over ¾ of the coast. These results have important implications for the risk management sector.

Julia Rulent et al.

Status: final response (author comments only)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on nhess-2021-118', Anonymous Referee #1, 22 Jun 2021
    • AC1: 'Reply on RC1', Julia Rulent, 19 Jul 2021
  • RC2: 'Comment on nhess-2021-118', Anonymous Referee #2, 29 Jun 2021
    • AC2: 'Reply on RC2', Julia Rulent, 19 Jul 2021
  • RC3: 'Comment on nhess-2021-118', Anonymous Referee #3, 01 Jul 2021
    • AC3: 'Reply on RC3', Julia Rulent, 19 Jul 2021

Julia Rulent et al.

Julia Rulent et al.

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Short summary
High coastal total water levels (TWL) can lead to flooding and hazardous conditions for coastal communities and environment. In this research we are using numerical models to study the interactions between three main components of the TWL (waves, tides and surges) at the UK and Irish coasts during winter 2013/14. The main finding of this research is that extreme waves and surges can indeed happen together, even at high tide, but they often occurred simultaneously 2–3 hours before high tide.
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