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Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2020-47
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/nhess-2020-47
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  24 Feb 2020

24 Feb 2020

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This preprint was under review for the journal NHESS but the revision was not accepted.

Wide sensitive area of small foreshocks

Chieh-Hung Chen1,2, Yang-Yi Sun1, Strong Wen3, Peng Han4, Li-Ching Lin5, Huai-Zhong Yu6, XueMin Zhang7, Yongxin Gao8, Chi-Chia Tang1,2, Cheng-Horng Lin9, and Jann-Yenq Liu10,11,12 Chieh-Hung Chen et al.
  • 1Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China
  • 2State Key Laboratory of Geological Processes and Mineral Resources, Institute of Geophysics and Geomatics, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan, China
  • 3Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan
  • 4Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen, China
  • 5Science and Technology Policy Research and Information Center Taiwan, Taiwan
  • 6China Earthquake Networks Center, Beijing, China
  • 7Institute of Earthquake Forecasting, China Earthquake Administration, Beijing, China
  • 8School of Civil Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei, China
  • 9Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan
  • 10Graduate Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
  • 11Center for Astronautical Physics and Engineering, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan
  • 12Center for Space and Remote Sensing Research, National Central University, Taoyuan, Taiwan

Abstract. Scientists demystify stress changes within tens of days before a mainshock and often utilize its foreshock as an indicator. Typically, foreshocks are detected near fault zones, which may be due to the distribution of seismometers. This study investigates changes in seismicity far from mainshocks by examining tens of thousands of M >= 2 quakes that were monitored by dense seismic arrays for more than 10 years in Taiwan and Japan. The quakes occurred within epicentral distances ranging from 0 km to 400 km during a period of 60 days before and after the mainshocks that are utilized to exhibit common behaviors of seismicity in the spatiotemporal domain. The superimposition results show that wide areas exhibit increased seismicity associated with mainshocks being more than 50 times to areas of the fault rupture. The seismicity increase initially concentrates in the fault zones, and gradually expands outward to over 50 km away from the epicenters approximately 40 days before the mainshocks. The seismicity increases more rapidly around the fault zones approximately 20 days before the mainshocks. The stressed crust triggers resonance at frequencies varying from ~ 3 × 10−4 Hz to ~ 10−3 Hz (i.e., variable frequency) along with earthquake-related stress that migrates from exterior areas to approach the fault zones. The variable frequency is determined by the observation of continuous seismic waveforms through the superimposition processes and is further supported by the resonant frequency model. These results suggest that the variable frequency of ground vibrations is a function of areas with increased seismicity leading to earthquakes.

Chieh-Hung Chen et al.

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Chieh-Hung Chen et al.

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Continuous seismic waveforms C.-H. Chen https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.1jwstqjqq

Chieh-Hung Chen et al.

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Short summary
Scientists demystify stress changes before mainshocks and utilize its foreshocks as an indicator. We investigate changes in seismicity far from mainshocks by using tens of thousands of M >= 2 quakes for 10 years in Taiwan and Japan. The results show that wide areas exhibit increased seismicity being more than 50 times to areas of the fault rupture. The stressed crust triggers resonance at frequencies varying from ~ 3 × 10−4 to ~ 10−3 Hz that is supported by the resonant frequency model.
Scientists demystify stress changes before mainshocks and utilize its foreshocks as an...
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